Free New Horizons Band Concert set for Dec. 3 at Johnson County Community College

A free concert by the New Horizons Band is set for 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 3, at the Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park.

This concert is the last of two the group is offering this fall. For this event, the band is expected to play for about an hour. This top-notch entertainment is free of charge.

The New Horizons Band is a program of the 50 Plus Department of the Johnson County Park and Recreation District in conjunction with the University of Missouri - Kansas City’s Conservatory of Music and Dance and Meyer Music. The band is a group of music-loving adults age 50 and older who meet about once a week to practice. The group includes brass, woodwind, and percussion. New Horizons has been in existence for about five years and currently has about 45 band members, including members who come from as far as Blue Spring to participate. The band is directed by Dr. Lindsey Williams, who is an associate professor of music therapy and music education at the University of Missouri - Kansas City.

For anyone interested in joining the group, the band meets for practices weekly on Tuesday nights beginning at 6 p.m. at the Roeland Park Community Center, 4850 Rosewood Dr., Roeland Park. Beginning band lessons are also available. For more information about the band or the upcoming concerts, call (913) 826-3160.

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